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Read Introduction to 1 Thessalonians

 

“…and indeed you do so toward all the brethren who are in all Macedonia. But we urge you, brethren, that you increase more and more…“
 
and indeed
These words confirm verse nine. The Thessalonians were already living examples of those who show love for fellow Christians.
you do so toward all the brethren who are in all Macedonia.
The Thessalonians loved believers throughout the province of Macedonia that included such churches as the Berean and Philippian church.
But we urge you, brethren, that you increase more and more
Paul urges the Thessalonian believers to develop momentum in their love for one another. God did not need to teach them about loving one another but Paul needed to teach them to abound in their love for one another. Christians are constantly to expand their realm of love.
Principle:
God wants us to expand our love to a broad range of believers.
Application:
How extensive is your love? Do you, “love us four and no more?” God wants us to love those we already love more than we do. He also wants us to expand the sphere of those we love.
“And this I pray, that your love may abound still more and more in knowledge and all discernment…” (Philippians 1:9).
An overflowing heart of love is one of the surest evidences of spirituality. It is impossible to love fellow Christians too much.
“But the fruit of the Spirit is love, joy, peace, longsuffering, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness, self-control. Against such there is no law.” (Galatians 5:22-23).
The more Christians love each other the less they pick at each other. The less they love each other the more they snipe and undermine each other.
“But if you bite and devour one another, beware lest you be consumed by one another!” (Galatians 5:15).
The love that increases and spreads is undaunted love. A shriveled love is a dying love. Those who fall out of love tend toward discord. There is very little harmony without extensive love. The greater the love, the greater the harmony. The greater the volume of love, the less the criticism. This is axiomatic.
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