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Read Introduction to 1 Corinthians


27 “If any of those who do not believe invites you to dinner, and you desire to go, eat whatever is set before you, asking no question for conscience’ sake. 28But if anyone says to you, “This was offered to idols,” do not eat it for the sake of the one who told you, and for conscience’ sake; for “the earth is the Lord’s, and all its fullness.” 29“Conscience,” I say, not your own, but that of the other. For why is my liberty judged by another man’s conscience? 30But if I partake with thanks, why am I evil spoken of for the food over which I give thanks?”
 

10:27
If any of those who do not believe invites you to dinner, and you desire to go, eat whatever is set before you, asking no question for conscience’ sake.
The question in this verse had to do with a believer receiving an invitation to dinner from a Christian who made a religious issue over meat offered to idols: What was to be the norm for accepting this invitation? Paul instructed the mature believer not to ask questions about whether the meat was offered to idols. To do so would make a religious issue about the dinner invitation. The point was not about whether it was wrong for the believer but how the weaker believer perceived it.
10:28
But if anyone says to you, “This was offered to idols,” do not eat it for the sake of the one who told you, and for conscience’ sake;
However, if the weaker believer made an issue out of the meat offered to idols, the mature believer should not eat the meat because then it would be a religious matter. The phrase “for conscience’ sake” refers to the weaker Christian’s conscience. The mature Christian was not to violate the weaker Christian’s conscience in eating the meat.
for “the earth is the Lord’s, and all its fullness.”
Paul again quotes Psalm 24:1 to establish that this is not an issue of intrinsic morality but of practical significance. This phrase is not in some manuscripts.
10:29
“Conscience,” I say, not your own, but that of the other.
The focus is on the conscience of the weaker Christian.
For why is my liberty judged by another man’s conscience?
Why should a weaker Christian’s conscience determine the mature believer’s freedom or liberty? Because the weaker Christian’s conscience is more important than the mature believer’s liberty. The mature believer’s freedom to eat any meat is inherently good because all meat comes from God (Ps. 24:1).
10:30
But if I partake with thanks, why am I evil spoken of for the food over which I give thanks?
Weaker Christians often criticize believers who exercise their liberty. Although we do not alter convictions even though people speak evil of us, nevertheless we are willing to change our behavior for the sake of weaker Christians. It is always better to sacrifice liberty than to injure someone spiritually.
PRINCIPLE:  
There are exceptions to exercising the principle of our liberty in Christ.
APPLICATION: 
When we modify our behavior for the good of others, we operate on a higher principle than our personal freedom in Christ. If a weak Christian makes an issue over something that deals with his or her conscience, then the mature believer should be willing to sacrifice freedom for the sake of his or her conscience. We do not do it for our sake but for their sakes.
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