Select Page
Read Introduction to Matthew

 

24When they had come to Capernaum, those who received the temple tax came to Peter and said, “Does your Teacher not pay the temple tax?” 25He said, “Yes.” And when he had come into the house, Jesus anticipated him, saying, “What do you think, Simon? From whom do the kings of the earth take customs or taxes, from their sons or from strangers?” 26Peter said to Him, “From strangers.” Jesus said to him, “Then the sons are free. 27Nevertheless, lest we offend them, go to the sea, cast in a hook, and take the fish that comes up first. And when you have opened its mouth, you will find a piece of money; take that and give it to them for Me and you.”  

 

We now come to the miracle of the tax money (17:24-27). Only Matthew, the tax collector, recorded this miracle.

17:24

When they had come to Capernaum, those who received the temple tax came to Peter and said, “Does your Teacher not pay the temple tax?”

Capernaum was a busy sea-side city, the headquarters of Jesus’ ministry. Jewish leaders asked Peter if Jesus paid the temple tax for support of the temple in Jerusalem. Every male 20 years old or over had to pay a temple tax of a half-shekel (two days’ wages).

17:25

He said, “Yes.” And when he had come into the house, Jesus anticipated him, saying, “What do you think, Simon? From whom do the kings of the earth take customs or taxes, from their sons or from strangers?”

Rulers of Jesus’ day did not tax their own families but taxed everyone else. Family members were exempt from taxation.

17:26

Peter said to Him, “From strangers.” Jesus said to him, “Then the sons are free.

Since rulers taxed strangers and not their families, their sons were free from taxation.

17:27

Nevertheless, lest we offend them, go to the sea, cast in a hook, and take the fish that comes up first. And when you have opened its mouth, you will find a piece of money; take that and give it to them for Me and you.”

Although Jesus was free from tax because He was the Son of the Father of the temple, He nevertheless agreed to pay the temple tax.

PRINCIPLE:

Christians sometimes sacrifice their liberty so as not to offend others.

APPLICATION:

Although Christians have liberty in Christ, we sometimes honor other viewpoints. Side issues can sidetrack us from our true goals.

“Conscience,” I say, not your own, but that of the other. For why is my liberty judged by another man’s conscience? 30But if I partake with thanks, why am I evil spoken of for the food over which I give thanks? 31Therefore, whether you eat or drink, or whatever you do, do all to the glory of God. 32Give no offense, either to the Jews or to the Greeks or to the church of God, 33just as I also please all men in all things, not seeking my own profit, but the profit of many, that they may be saved. 1 Co 10:29

Share