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Read Introduction to 2 Corinthians


8
For even if I made you sorry with my letter, I do not regret it; though I did regret it. For I perceive that the same epistle made you sorry, though only for a while.

 

In verses 8 and 9, Paul partly apologies to the Corinthian church for the scathing letter he sent by Titus. However, he ultimately did not regret sending it because of the result on the church.

For even if I made you sorry with my letter,

Paul sent a grievous letter by Titus to the Corinthian church. This letter stung the church deeply.

I do not regret it;

The apostle did not regret sending the blistering letter to the church, although he did regret it temporally at a point in the past. He was reluctant to discipline the church.

The word “regret” carries emotion as well as the thought process.

though I did regret it.

While Paul waited for the church’s response, which was brought by Titus, he had a moment of regret or sorrow for sending the stinging message.

For I perceive that the same epistle made you sorry [remorse],

The reason Paul did not regret the confrontational letter was because the church repented.

though only for a while.

Paul’s rebuke of the church lasted only for a brief season until Titus brought him the letter’s positive result.

PRINCIPLE:

There are times when truth must take precedence over relationships.

APPLICATION:

Christian leaders do not relish their roles in rebuking their people; however, it is essential. Parents do not relish discipling their children, but because they love them, they do not hesitate to do it. It is challenging to minister effectively to people while disciplining them. There are times when the truth is more important than relationships. To fawn over people at the cost of God’s will is a standard error among Christian leaders today. It is not the purpose of a minister to make people feel good necessarily. There is a fine line between maintaining a relationship with those we serve and causing them pain for the right purpose.

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