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7 Now on the first day of the week, when the disciples came together to break bread, Paul, ready to depart the next day, spoke to them and continued his message until midnight. 8 There were many lamps in the upper room where they were gathered together. 9 And in a window sat a certain young man named Eutychus, who was sinking into a deep sleep. He was overcome by sleep; and as Paul continued speaking, he fell down from the third story and was taken up dead. 10 But Paul went down, fell on him, and embracing him said, “Do not trouble yourselves, for his life is in him.” 11 Now when he had come up, had broken bread and eaten, and talked a long while, even till daybreak, he departed. 12 And they brought the young man in alive, and they were not a little comforted.

 

In verses 7-12, we find Paul and his companions ministering in Troas.

20:7

Now on the first day of the week, when the disciples came together to break bread, Paul, ready to depart the next day, spoke to them and continued his message until midnight.

The group stayed in Troas for seven days, but on Sunday, Paul and his team broke bread (Lord’s supper) with believers in Troas (Acts 2:42). They were to leave the next day. The long-winded apostle spoke until midnight.

The reference to worship on Sunday is clear evidence that the church should gather on Sundays, not Saturdays (1 Co 16:2).

20:8

There were many lamps in the upper room where they were gathered together.

Many lamps were in the upper room where the group gathered for church.

20:9

And in a window sat a certain young man named Eutychus, who was sinking into a deep sleep. He was overcome by sleep; and as Paul continued speaking, he fell down from the third story and was taken up dead.

A young man named Eutychus fell asleep during Paul’s long message until midnight (I have experienced the same phenomenon as a pastor!). This young person fell three stories to the ground and died. Luke, the author of Acts, was a physician who could confirm his death.

20:10

But Paul went down, fell on him, and embracing him said, “Do not trouble yourselves, for his life is in him.”

Paul restored Eutychus from death and encouraged other church members that he was alive.

20:11

Now when he had come up, had broken bread and eaten, and talked a long while, even till daybreak, he departed.

The apostle returned to the third story to continue his message, which lasted until daybreak (I have never preached a sermon that long! My congregations should take solace that I did not do it!). After he preached his long message, he departed from Troas. The church took pleasure in participating in the Lord’s supper that evening.

20:12

And they brought the young man in alive, and they were not a little comforted.

Many church members were comforted by the saving of Eutychus’s life.

PRINCIPLE:

A pastor’s only authority resides in his teaching the Word.

APPLICATION:

Pastors need to be careful that they continually “exhort” from the Word of God (Acts 20:1; Col 1:28). Preaching from the Word was central in the first century (Acts 10:42; 13:5, 32; 14:7, 15, 21, 15:35; 16:10; 17:3, 13, 20:25; 28:31; Eph 4:12-14; 1 Tim 3:16-17; 4:13). Pastors have no authority but the authority that originates from Scripture. If people responsible for the local church strip Scriptures from their ministries, all that remains is the mere dead words of men.

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