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10 And as we stayed many days, a certain prophet named Agabus came down from Judea. 11 When he had come to us, he took Paul’s belt, bound his own hands and feet, and said, “Thus says the Holy Spirit, ‘So shall the Jews at Jerusalem bind the man who owns this belt, and deliver him into the hands of the Gentiles.’ ” 12Now when we heard these things, both we and those from that place pleaded with him not to go up to Jerusalem. 13 Then Paul answered, “What do you mean by weeping and breaking my heart? For I am ready not only to be bound, but also to die at Jerusalem for the name of the Lord Jesus.” 14 So when he would not be persuaded, we ceased, saying, “The will of the Lord be done.”

 

21:10

And as we stayed many days, a certain prophet named Agabus came down from Judea.

After staying with Philip’s family for “many days,” a prophet named Agabus came from Judea to warn Paul about going to Jerusalem. Agabus had the gift of prophecy; he previously foretold the famine of Judea AD 46 (Acts 11:28).

21:11

When he had come to us, he took Paul’s belt, bound his own hands and feet, and said,

Agabus gave a dramatic illustration or symbol of his warning about Paul going to Jerusalem by binding his hands and feet with Paul’s girdle from his waist (leather or cloth).

“Thus says the Holy Spirit,

Agabus claimed the Holy Spirit gave him the prophecy about Paul going to Jerusalem. There seems to have been a conflict here because the Holy Spirit had previously commanded Paul to go to Jerusalem (Acts 20:22). Both messages were true; the Spirit commanded Paul to go, and the Spirit warned him about going. Agabus’ indication may not have been a warning but a prediction.

‘So shall the Jews at Jerusalem bind the man who owns this belt, and deliver him into the hands of the Gentiles.’ ”

Now, Agabus gave the verbal meaning of tying his hands and feet. The Jews would deliver Paul to Gentile leaders who would imprison Paul.

21:12

Now when we heard these things, both we and those from that place pleaded with him not to go up to Jerusalem.

After hearing Agabus’s warning, Paul’s friends pled with Paul not to go to Jerusalem.

21:13

Then Paul answered, “What do you mean by weeping and breaking my heart? For I am ready not only to be bound, but also to die at Jerusalem for the name of the Lord Jesus.”

Paul’s response to his friends was that he was willing to be imprisoned and even die in Jerusalem for his Lord.

21:14

So when he would not be persuaded, we ceased, saying, “The will of the Lord be done.”

Paul’s friends ceased trying to persuade him not to go to Jerusalem. They put his problem in the hands of the Lord by saying, “The will of the Lord be done.” Evidently, Luke also appealed to Paul not to go to Jerusalem. Note the use of “we.” This was Luke’s way of including himself as he wrote Acts.

PRINCIPLE:

It is important to respect the vision of Christian leaders.

APPLICATION:

After trying to change Paul’s determination to go to Jerusalem, they acceded to what he determined as God’s will for him. They did not diminish his vision but committed the issue to God’s will. Jesus followed this principle as well (Lu 22:42).

Believers need to value other options about what they should do, but their ultimate regard should be God’s will for them.

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