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23 So the next day, when Agrippa and Bernice had come with great pomp, and had entered the auditorium with the commanders and the prominent men of the city, at Festus’ command Paul was brought in. 24 And Festus said: “King Agrippa and all the men who are here present with us, you see this man about whom the whole assembly of the Jews petitioned me, both at Jerusalem and here, crying out that he was not fit to live any longer. 25 But when I found that he had committed nothing deserving of death, and that he himself had appealed to Augustus, I decided to send him. 26 I have nothing certain to write to my lord concerning him. Therefore I have brought him out before you, and especially before you, King Agrippa, so that after the examination has taken place I may have something to write. 27 For it seems to me unreasonable to send a prisoner and not to specify the charges against him.”

 

From verses 23 through 26:32, Festus puts Paul’s case before King Agrippa so that he can determine the legalevidence necessary before the court in Rome.

25:23

So the next day, when Agrippa and Bernice had come with great pomp, and had entered the auditorium with the commanders and the prominent men of the city, at Festus’ command Paul was brought in.

The next day, after Agrippa requested to hear from Paul, he and his “wife” Bernice came to assess Paul’s legal case with “great pomp.” He entered the auditorium with commanders (plural commanders of a thousand soldiers) and prominent men of the city. After the entry scene, Festus orders Paul to be brought before the group.

25:24

And Festus said: “King Agrippa and all the men who are here present with us, you see this man about whom the whole assembly of the Jews petitioned me, both at Jerusalem and here, crying out that he was not fit to live any longer.

Festus informed Agrippa of the entire assembly of Jew’s desire for Paul’s case to be in their favor. They had petitioned him to hear Paul’s case in Jerusalem and already concluded that he was to be executed for what he did.

25:25

But when I found that he had committed nothing deserving of death, and that he himself had appealed to Augustus, I decided to send him.

Festus told Agrippa that he found nothing worthy of capital death in Paul when the apostle appealed for a trial before the court of Caesar, so how would he represent the legal case to Rome? It was not wise for Festus to send Paul to Rome without clear evidence against him. Both Felix and Festus came to the same conclusion that Paul did no capital crime deserving of death under Roman law (Acts 23:9, 29; 26:31).

25:26

I have nothing certain to write to my lord concerning him. Therefore I have brought him out before you, and especially before you, King Agrippa, so that after the examination has taken place I may have something to write.

Festus hoped that after King Agrippa heard Paul’s case, he would have something legal to write to the Roman court about why he sent Paul to them. It would be a blight on Festus’ administrative capability for him to send a prisoner to Caesar’s court without adequate evidence.

25:27

For it seems to me unreasonable to send a prisoner and not to specify the charges against him.”

It was unacceptable and unreasonable for Festus to send Paul as a prisoner to the emperor’s court without specific charges against him.

PRINCIPLE:

Every believer should honor the government.

APPLICATION:

Paul used his appeal to Caesar because the government of Judea did not do its job in giving him a trial. Instead, he took the situation to employ even a higher level of government for his case. He understood and used his rights in government. Government is a divine institution whereby God uses it to protect its citizens. That is why believers are to honor governmental leadership and administration. It is a biblical imperative (Ro 13:1-5).

There was a higher purpose in Paul’s adversity with the government because God wanted Paul to go to Rome for a testimony about Christ.

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