Select Page
Read Introduction to Acts

 

13 When the south wind blew softly, supposing that they had obtained their desire, putting out to sea, they sailed close by Crete. 14 But not long after, a tempestuous head wind arose, called Euroclydon. 15 So when the ship was caught, and could not head into the wind, we let her drive. 16 And running under the shelter of an island called Clauda, we secured the skiff with difficulty. 17 When they had taken it on board, they used cables to undergird the ship; and fearing lest they should run aground on the Syrtis Sands, they struck sail and so were driven. 18 And because we were exceedingly tempest-tossed, the next day they lightened the ship. 19 On the third day we threw the ship’s tackle overboard with our own hands. 20 Now when neither sun nor stars appeared for many days, and no small tempest beat on us, all hope that we would be saved was finally given up. 21 But after long abstinence from food, then Paul stood in the midst of them and said, “Men, you should have listened to me, and not have sailed from Crete and incurred this disaster and loss. 22 And now I urge you to take heart, for there will be no loss of life among you, but only of the ship. 23 For there stood by me this night an angel of the God to whom I belong and whom I serve, 24 saying, ‘Do not be afraid, Paul; you must be brought before Caesar; and indeed God has granted you all those who sail with you.’ 25 Therefore take heart, men, for I believe God that it will be just as it was told me. 26 However, we must run aground on a certain island.”  

 

Acts 27:13-38 explains how the ship was caught in a violent storm 

27:13 

When the south wind blew softly, supposing that they had obtained their desire, putting out to sea, they sailed close by Crete. 

After the wind began to blow “softly,” they put out to sea and sailed close to the island of Crete on their way to Phoenix.  

27:14 

But not long after, a tempestuous head wind arose, called Euroclydon. 

Soon after their launch, they faced a violent headwind called Euroclydon.  

27:15 

So when the ship was caught, and could not head into the wind, we let her drive. 

Since the ship could not be steered against the headwind, they allowed it to be driven by the wind.  

27:16 

And running under the shelter of an island called Clauda, we secured the skiff with difficulty. 

The ship found shelter on the small island called Clauda, 23 miles south of Crete, where they regained control of the ship.  

27:17 

When they had taken it on board, they used cables to undergird the ship; and fearing lest they should run aground on the Syrtis Sands, they struck sail and so were driven. 

After fearing they would be run aground on the Syrtis Sands (off Libya along the North African coast), they struck sail but were driven by the wind again.  

27:18 

And because we were exceedingly tempest-tossed, the next day they lightened the ship. 

The storm became so violent that they had to toss the cargo overboard.  

27:19 

On the third day we threw the ship’s tackle overboard with our own hands. 

On the third day of the storm, they threw the ship’s tackle overboard.  

27:20 

Now when neither sun nor stars appeared for many days, and no small tempest beat on us, all hope that we would be saved was finally given up. 

The persistent tempest beat on the ship, so the group gave up hope that they would be saved.  

27:21 

But after long abstinence from food, then Paul stood in the midst of them and said, “Men, you should have listened to me, and not have sailed from Crete and incurred this disaster and loss. 

Paul made an announcement after the group had not eaten for many days. He reminded them they should have listened to his warning 

27:22 

And now I urge you to take heart, for there will be no loss of life among you, but only of the ship. 

Paul encouraged the group to keep a good attitude because none of them would lose their lives, but they would lose the ship.  

27:23 

For there stood by me this night an angel of the God to whom I belong and whom I serve, 

Paul explained why he was confident the group would be saved, as an angel of God appeared to him. The God whom he served revealed to him what would happen to the ship. 

27:24 

saying, ‘Do not be afraid, Paul; you must be brought before Caesar; and indeed God has granted you all those who sail with you.’ 

The angel assured Paul they would be brought before Caesar’s court, and he would not lose his life. God guaranteed Paul that everyone sailing with him would be saved.  

27:25 

Therefore take heart, men, for I believe God that it will be just as it was told me. 

Paul made it clear that the promise from God would come true exactly as it had been told him.  

27:26 

However, we must run aground on a certain island.” 

Additionally, Paul made it clear that the ship would wreck on a “certain island.”  

PRINCIPLE: 

Christians need to be conscious of the presence of God in danger.  

APPLICATION: 

God constantly encouraged Paul by direct revelation, and the apostle, in turn, encouraged others with the message (Acts 27:22, 25). Paul made it clear that he was a man who exercised faith in God. He counted on the presence of God in his troubles (He 13:5).   

Share