Select Page
Read Introduction to Acts

 

17 And it came to pass after three days that Paul called the leaders of the Jews together. So when they had come together, he said to them: “Men and brethren, though I have done nothing against our people or the customs of our fathers, yet I was delivered as a prisoner from Jerusalem into the hands of the Romans, 18who, when they had examined me, wanted to let me go, because there was no cause for putting me to death.19 But when the Jews spoke against it, I was compelled to appeal to Caesar, not that I had anything of which to accuse my nation. 20 For this reason therefore I have called for you, to see you and speak with you,because for the hope of Israel I am bound with this chain.” 21 Then they said to him, “We neither received letters from Judea concerning you, nor have any of the brethren who came reported or spoken any evil of you. 22 But we desire to hear from you what you think; for concerning this sect, we know that it is spoken against everywhere.”

 

In 28:17-22, Paul speaks to Jewish leaders in Rome. The story of Acts is how God moved from presenting the gospel to the Jews to the Gentiles. Nevertheless, He is persistent in presenting the Messiah to Jews wherever they may be found.

28:17

And it came to pass after three days that Paul called the leaders of the Jews together. So when they had come together, he said to them: “Men and brethren, though I have done nothing against our people or the customs of our fathers, yet I was delivered as a prisoner from Jerusalem into the hands of the Romans,

Paul asked local Jewish leaders to visit him. He related that he had done nothing against Israel or her customs, yet Rome arrested him for doing so.

28:18

who, when they had examined me, wanted to let me go, because there was no cause for putting me to death.

Paul recounts to the local Jews that after the Romans examined him, they found no guilt in him and wanted to release him from custody. There was no evidence for putting him to death.

28:19

But when the Jews spoke against it, I was compelled to appeal to Caesar, not that I had anything of which to accuse my nation.

Paul tells the local Jews in Rome that the Jews in Jerusalem objected to his release, and then he exercised his right to appeal to Caesar. There was no evidence for the accusations against him.

28:20

For this reason therefore I have called for you, to see you and speak with you, because for the hope of Israel I am bound with this chain.”

Paul said that the reason he called for local Jews to see him was so that they could see he was under trial for “the hope of Israel.” The “hope” was the anticipation of the Jews that the Messiah would come. Paul deemed that Jesus was the Messiah.

28:21

Then they said to him, “We neither received letters from Judea concerning you, nor have any of the brethren who came reported or spoken any evil of you.

The Jews responded that they received no evil reports, whether spoken or written, about Paul from Judea.

28:22

But we desire to hear from you what you think; for concerning this sect, we know that it is spoken against everywhere.”

The local Jews knew about Paul’s theological convictions because they were opposed everywhere.

PRINCIPLE:

There is a time of solemn decision for the Jews.

APPLICATION:

Paul always went to the Jew first, then to the Gentile. He never veered from that plan. Neither did he veer from his message this time.

As a result of the Jew’s rejection of their Messiah, Paul announced to the Jews in Italy and to Jews everywhere that God rejected Israel as a nation. It was because of their judicial blindness to the gospel. This pronouncement would continue until the fulness of the Gentiles comes to an end. Individual Jews will be saved, but the nation will be lost until Christ comes again.  

Share