Select Page
Read Introduction to Daniel

 

Daniel 2: 46 “Then King Nebuchadnezzar fell on his face, prostrate before Daniel, and commanded that they should present an offering and incense to him. 47 The king answered Daniel, and said, “Truly your God is the God of gods, the Lord of kings, and a revealer of secrets, since you could reveal this secret.” 48 Then the king promoted Daniel and gave him many great gifts; and he made him ruler over the whole province of Babylon, and chief administrator over all the wise men of Babylon. 49 Also Daniel petitioned the king, and he set Shadrach, Meshach, and Abed-Nego over the affairs of the province of Babylon; but Daniel sat in the gate of the king.”

 

2:46

Then King Nebuchadnezzar fell on his face, prostrate before Daniel, and commanded that they should present an offering and incense to him.

Nebuchadnezzar worshiped Daniel and regarded him as a god. 

2:47

The king answered Daniel, and said, “Truly your God is the God of gods, the Lord of kings, and a revealer of secrets, since you could reveal this secret.”

Nebuchadnezzar turned positive to Daniel’s God but did not embrace Him as God.  Nebuchadnezzar eventually turned out to be fatheaded and came to believe all his success was due to himself.  He made an image of gold to portray that fact.  However, at this time, he acknowledged that the God of Daniel was supreme over the gods of his polytheistic system.  This was especially true in the revealing of “this secret” of the human colossus of world governments. 

2:48

Then the king promoted Daniel and gave him many great gifts; and he made him ruler over the whole province of Babylon, and chief administrator over all the wise men of Babylon.

The king promoted Daniel to the position of chief of the wise men.  He also made him satrap of Babylon.  Normally this title would have been given to a Chaldean.  Daniel received both presents and power, making him an important person in the Chaldean Empire. 

2:49

Also Daniel petitioned the king, and he set Shadrach, Meshach, and Abed-Nego over the affairs of the province of Babylon; but Daniel sat in the gate of the king.

Sitting at the “gate of the king” meant that Daniel sat as Chief of the Supreme Court of the Chaldean Empire.  Instead of gloating in his success, he immediately thought of others.  He remembered his friends.  Success did not destroy his friendship with them. 

PRINCIPLE: 

Man’s wisdom is temporal while God’s wisdom is eternal. 

APPLICATION: 

Daniel did not allow his success to go to his head.  Nebuchadnezzar was filled with ego and power lust.  Daniel gave glory to God.  When the world does homage to what we do, do we give glory to God? 

Man’s extremity is God’s opportunity.  God uses crisis to move believers into the picture.  Daniel put his trust in God through it all.  Catastrophe of a nation is a great opportunity for sharing our faith. 

Here are some lessons from chapter two:

God is sovereign over the governments of the world.

God moves the world toward His own end.

Daniel did not seek prominence but God gave it to him because of his faithfulness.

Truth always exposes error.

God’s kingdom is eternal; man’s kingdoms are temporal.

There is futility in man’s wisdom.  Man’s wisdom is for time but God’s wisdom is eternal. 

Share